The Whole Truth Movie Review 2021

Review The Whole Truth is a thriller-mystery-drama directed by Wisit Sasanatieng with a haunting family horror story
Review The Whole Truth is a thriller-mystery-drama directed by Wisit Sasanatieng with a haunting family horror story.

the-whole-truth-2021-review

The Whole Truth stars actors Sutatta U domainsilp, Nattapat Nimjirawat and Sompob Benjathikul among others. The film is 125 minutes long.

The Whole Truth is an odd combination of The Grudge and The Visit. You know you're jumping into an M. Night Shyamalan movie the moment a mysterious old man the kids have never seen before visits them.

The opening premise draws you in; A mother of two (Mia) is involved in a car accident with a drunk driver, and is hospitalized in a coma. Her two children, Putt and Pim, stay at their grandparents' house. Interestingly, they had never met their grandparents before. The longer they stayed at home, the more they noticed a hole in the wall that seemed to look into the house next door. Terror struck in waves as the children drew closer to the truth.

And in fact, The Whole Truth holds a lot of promise. Netflix's movie teases audiences as much as the characters, but the way the movie plots is limited. Every time one of the children saw the hole in the wall, the other asked, “Can you see the hole in the wall?” Yes, we can all see it. Directors forget that audiences have eyes and a movie is not a story told to them.

At the end of the film, it is revealed that things are not as the children imagined. The sweet amnesiac grandma is not as cute and innocent as she looks. Mom too, and grandfather, his uncontrollable rage turned into his downfall, and in the end, things quickly spiraled out of control.


The movie's intro is amazing; it sets the mood with a great combination of cleverly placed visuals, along with great camera work that zooms through the hole where the story comes out, revealing layer after layer of events aghast.

The accompanying music also adds to the tension and creates anticipation for the audience.

The use of shades of blue and green gives the effect that something unusual and certain scary will happen to the characters as these shades dominate most scenes.

The Whole Truth misses out on the basics of a horror movie; builds tension, engages the audience, leaves words unsaid and encapsulates what horror really is. By the time you get to the end of this movie, this shift is already beyond an overly long movie maybe over an hour.

The characters do their best with a revealing script, and it's clear that the director tried to throw in as much horror as possible. And admittedly, the use of sound has worked, but this is misguided and off-topic – even a story of “the horror of manifest truth” is not enough to save the movie.